Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo

We finally have a print copy of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Jill Twiss. The book was announced (and released) on March 18th during an episode of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver with some controversy. Independent booksellers were blindsided by the release and questioned business ethics as the book was first made available to Amazon.¹ The larger conversation was around the fact that the book was published as a parody of Marlon Bundo’s A Day in the Life of the Vice President, written by Charlotte Pence and illustrated by Karen Pence. Both books star the Pence family pet, Marlon Bundo, but one is a biography of the Vice President, while the other is about same-sex marriage.

The release of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo was political, serving as Oliver’s response to Mike Pence’s indirect support of anti-gay organizations.² The plot is about gay marriage and pictures contain cues for adults. At the same time, the book introduces broader themes that go beyond this specific political situation. Twiss writes about the essentials of democracy and diversity, ideas that are universal regardless of who is in power. You can checkout the book in print or electronically from our library.

  1. Green, Alex. “Booksellers Outraged by Chronicle’s Rollout of John Oliver Book.” Publishers Weekly, 26 March 2018, https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/bookselling/article/76440-booksellers-outraged-by-chronicle-s-rollout-of-john-oliver-book.html. Accessed 26 April 2018.
  2. “Mike Pence: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO).” YouTube, uploaded by LastWeek Tonight, 18 March 2018, https://youtu.be/rs2RlZQVXBU.

Real Talk: Climate & Advocacy (video)

Dr. Jim Angel, Illinois State Climatologist will present the real science and facts about climate change and its impacts on the Chicagoland region. Lincoln Cohen will speak about his experience in the Climate Reality Project, an intensive advocacy and awareness training program first developed by Al Gore. He will also discuss opportunities for the audience to engage in climate policy advocacy. This event is sponsored by the MVCC Center for Sustainability.

Real Talk: Climate & Advocacy

The audio of this discussion is available below:

New Name in Sports

Our local professional sports stadium is getting a new name. After the end of this current MLS season, Bridgeview’s Toyota Park will become SeatGeek Stadium. The 20,000 seat facility opened in 2006 and is the home to Major League Soccer’s Chicago Fire and to National Women’s Soccer League’s Chicago Red Stars. Besides the new naming rights, SeatGeek, the online ticket broker, will also work with the stadium’s management to bring more events to Bridgeview including concerts, music festivals, and international sporting events.

Naming stadiums after companies is nothing new. Chicago Cubs owner and chewing gum manufacturer William Wrigley named Wrigley Field back in 1926. But selling off just the right to name a stadium, without any other ownership involved, has become more and more common in recent years. While often very expensive for corporations, naming rights also garner lots of exposure for the brand through on-camera views and audio mentions.

If you are interested in reading more about this topic, here are few resources you might find helpful. To read more about naming rights in sports in general, have a look at these articles from our Academic Search Complete database. For a more Chicago area stadium focus, try these Chicago Tribune articles. Finally, to learn even more about sports stadiums, including some local Chicago ones, this search from our library catalog will be helpful.

 

 

 

2018 Pulitzer Prize Winners

The prestigious Pulitzers have been announced and we have some winners in the collection for you:

History: The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea by Jack E. Davis 

General Nonfiction: Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr.

Biography: Prarie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser 

Poetry: Half-Light: Collected Poems 1965-2016 by Frank Bidart

Various Recordings by Music winner Kendrick Lamar

Instapoet Queen Rupi Kaur

Rupi Kaur is one of the most popular poets in the world.  Do you know her? She is a (very) famous, (very) successful and (very) accessible poet who got her start by posting her spare poetry to her Instagram account (follow her rupikaur_). She has had 2 books published one of which – Milk and Honey – was a NYT #1 Bestseller.   The Sun and Her Flowers, which was just released last year, is also available for check out.

Read more about her in this Rolling Stone article and this from NPR.

Here are links to works in our catalog from a couple of the other poets mentioned in the Rolling Stone article:

Keep celebrating Poetry Month!

 

Video: Male Victims of Rape and Survivorship

Brendan Yukins from Rape Victim Advocates discusses the most common reason for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in men: sexual violence. Society at large stigmatizes men who have been raped, from joking about them in the media to denying male victimization in the criminal justice system. Brendan will be delving into American masculinity, how it compounds trauma for male survivors, and how we can redefine masculinity as a society to create a world free of shame for the 1 in 6 men who will survive sexual violence in their lifetime. This event is part of our One Book, We Believe You program.

Male Victims of Rape and Survivorship

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Video: Pursuing Creativity with a Purpose: Filmmaker Qasim Basir

For over 100 years of film and TV, the narrative of this country, and much of the world, has been controlled by a small group of people. And it has shaped the way people see different cultures, faiths, and communities – many times, in an imbalanced way. It has only been in the last 20-30 years that more diverse voices have been able to speak their truths and contribute to the re-education of a portrayal that’s been one-sided for far too long. This is the day to hear and tell the truth about who we are, in whatever medium you choose, to create a country that is meant to be “United.” Acclaimed film maker Qasim Basir will visit Moraine Valley to discuss his work and process. Special event that is part of the Mosaics: Muslim Voices in America program.

Pursuing Creativity with a Purpose: Filmmaker Qasim Basir

The audio of this discussion is available below:

1968: Fifty years since King, Kennedy, Clash, and Classrooms

This year, 2018, marks fifty years since several watershed moments in American History. Senator, Presidential candidate, and former Attorney General, Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated on June 5, 1968. In August 1968, anti-Vietnam war protesters converged on the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Then Mayor, Richard J. Daley responded to protesters by summoning over ten-thousand police officers along with active U.S. Army Troops, U.S. National Guardsmen, and Secret Service Agents. The protest and riots lasted 5 days.

However, there were two other history changing moments in 1968. First, April 4, 2018 commemorates 50 years since the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The Civil Rights Leader was slain in Memphis, Tennessee on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel. The assassination sparked riots across the country including Chicago. In the midst of all the civil unrest and uprisings that began the night on April 4th and the morning of April 5th, another lesser known historical moment unfolded.

Jane Elliott, an Iowa school teacher, decided to use the solemn moment of King’s assassination to teach her 3rd grade class about racial prejudice and inequality. Elliott used eye color as a segregator with her students, giving blue-eyed students positions of privilege while relegating the brown-eyed student to experiences of exclusion and social subordination. By 1970, Elliott was using her Blue-Eye Brown-Eye experiment as the basis for pioneering Diversity and Inclusion training. Jane Elliot continues her social justice work to this day, well in to her 80s.

Here are additional resources for 1968: Fifty years since King, Kennedy, Clash, and Classrooms

Bland, K. (2017, November). Blue eyes, brown eyes: What Jane Elliott’s famous exercise says about race 50 years on. The Republic. azcentral.com.

Bloom, S. G. (2005, September). Lesson of a Lifetime: Her bold experiment to teach Iowa third graders about racial prejudice divided townspeople and thrust her onto the national stage. Smithsonian Magazine. Smithsonian.com.

Chicago Public Media. (2018, April). Sorrow, Then Rage. WBEZ.org

Corporation, C. F. (Producer), & Guru-Murthy, K. (Director). (2009). The Event: How Racist Are You? with Jane Elliott [Motion Picture]. You Tube.

Elliot, J. (2016, May). Jane Elliott on The Rock Newman Show. (R. Newman, Interviewer) YouTube. PBS: WHUT.

Elliott, J. (2017, September). Educator Jane Elliott Talks Trump, Kaepernick and Fixing Racism. (C. T. Whitfield, Interviewer) NBCNews.com.

Films, Y. U. (Producer), Peters, W. (Writer), & Peters, W. (Director). (1985). A Class Divided [Motion Picture]. Fontline.

George, A. (2018). When Robert Kennedy Delivered the News of Martin Luther King’s Assassination. Smithsonian Magazine. Smithsonian.com.

Gibson, C. (2016, July). What happened in Chicago in 1968, and why is everyone talking about it now? WashingtonPost.com:

Gitlin, T. (2018, January). Rage Against the Machine: A short story reimagines the riots at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago and the chaos that shocked the world. Smithsonin Magazine. illustrations by Shane L.: Smithsonian.com.

Johnson, H. (2008). 1968 Democratic Convention: The Boss Strikes back. Smithsonian Magazine. Smithsonian.com.

Katz, J. (2018, January). Where RFK Was Killed, a Diverse Student Body Fulfills His Vision for America. Smithsonian Magazine. photography by Gregg Segal: Smithsonian.com.

Museum, N. C. (2018, April). National Civil Rights Museum Home Page. National Civil Rights Museum Home Page at the Lorraine Motel

New York Times. (2018, April). 50 Years Later, Remembering King, and the Battles That Outlived Him. nytimes.com

Small, A. S. (2018, April). ‘This was like a war’: Witnesses remember day MLK was shot. foxnews.com:

Tillet, S. (2018, April). Seeing Martin Luther King Jr. in a New Light. nytimes.com:

Tracy K. Smith, Official Poet of the United States

Start your Poetry Month celebrations by getting to know Tracy K. Smith!

She is the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry.  Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden appointed her to the position in June of last year.  The Library of Congress has a wonderful web guide all about her.

In 2012, Smith won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for the out of this world Life on Mars. 

If you are already familiar with her poetry and would like to know more about her life, check out Ordinary Light: A Memoir, which we also have in  e-book.

Finally, if you’re nosy reader like I am you’ll get a lot of joy out of  Tracy K. Smith: By the Book.

Enjoy this American treasure!